american art

from the colonial period to world war two

schedule

Tuesday 4 September

Introduction to the course

Lecture:  Colonial  Portraiture

Tuesday 11 September

Discussion of Craven chs. 3, 5, & 7 plus Paul Staiti, "Character and Class" (PDF)

Lecture:  Federal Period art and the Grand Manner

Tuesday 18 September

Discussion of Craven chs. 8, 10, 12 & 18 plus Vivien Fryd, "Two Sculptures for the Capitol" (PDF)

Lecture: Landscape Painting

Tuesday 25 September

Discussion of Craven ch. 15 plus Angela Miller, "Millenium/Apocalypse" (PDF)

Lecture: Manifest Destiny and the American West

Tuesday 2 October • Museum Paper 1 Due

Presentations on portraits & landscapes at the MFA

Lecture: Genre Painting and the American People

Tuesday 9 October

Discussion of Craven chs. 16, 19, and pp. 210-13 and 367-70

Lecture: American Realism

Tuesday 16 October

Discussion of Craven chs. 11, 23 (pp. 329-42), & 24

Review for Exam 1

Tuesday 23 October

Exam 1

Lecture: The Gilded Age and American expatriates

Tuesday 30 October

Discussion of Craven chs. 20, 22, & 23 (342-48), plus Whistler "Action for Libel" (PDF)

Lecture: How The Other Half Lives

Tuesday 6 November

Discussion of Craven chs. 25 (pp. 371-76), 29 (422-38) & 31 (468-76) plus Trachtenberg, "Lewis Hine" (PDF)

Lecture: Modernism in architecture

Tuesday 13 November

Discussion of Craven chs. 21, 24 (349-54), 27 & 33, plus Louis Sullivan, "The Tall Office Building" (PDF)

Lecture:  Modernism in art

Tuesday 20 November

Discussion of Craven ch. 30, plus "The Armory Show" readings (PDF)

Lecture:  After the Depression:  Social Realism and Regionalism

Tuesday 27 November

Discussion of Carven chs. 28, 29 (439-43), 31 (476-80), & 36 (543-550)

Catch-up

Tuesday 4 December  • Museum Paper 2 due

Presentations on museum paper 2

Reveiw for Exam 2; course evaluations

Tuesday 11 December

Exam 2

5:00- 6:30, Somerset 216


Each day I will pass out a set of around 3 to 5 questions concerning the following week's readings.  These questions will guide you to concentrate on the most important issues as you read the assignment:  everyone should think about them and come prepared to discuss them.  Some of you will be given the assignment of writing and presenting a 1-page response to one of these questions.  These presentations will serve to start a general discussion on the issues and relevant works, and should be turned in at the end of the class period.